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All you Need to Know if your Visa Application is Delayed

All you Need to Know if your Visa Application is Delayed

Is your visa application delayed? If so, and you need any advice or support with this or any other immigration-related topic, call us on 0161 532 7993

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The application process when applying for any type of visa is usually a long one, and waiting for a decision on your visa can be a tense and nervous experience.

The decision you receive on your application is bound to have a huge impact on your future, so any delay to the Home Office’s verdict is likely to create even more stress for you and your family.

Depending on the type of visa you’re applying for, the time it takes for the Home Office to process your application and get back to you with a decision could vary. However, for most UK visas you should expect to hear back within six months of first submitting your application.

Immigration status if visa application delayed

Providing you make an application within 28 days of your current visa expiring, your immigration status will stay the same while you wait for your new visa. This means if you already have the right to live, work and study in the UK, then you’ll still have those rights while you’re awaiting a decision from the Home Office on your new visa application.

However, keep in mind that if you apply after your visa has ended then you’ll usually lose those rights. The exact rules around this are complex and can differ massively depending on your circumstances, but if you require any assistance then speak to our team as we’re experts in this field and can offer advice on any visa-related query you may have.

How to prevent your visa application being delayed

Although delays with your visa may be caused by some things that are ultimately out of your control, there are still some steps you can take to prevent hold ups with your application.

The best way to avoid any unnecessary delays is by making sure your application from is filled out correctly, and all the supporting documentation is included. Again, the type of visa you’re applying for will determine exactly what needs to be submitted, but the instructions will set out all the requirements, so be sure to follow them to a tee, as any errors or missing documentation could cause severe delays to your application.

Other reasons your visa application might be delayed

As well as missing documents or errors on the application form, there may be some other reasons why the Home Office is taking longer than expected to make a decision on your visa.

In some situations the process might be a little less straight-forward, and the Home Office may require some additional information before a decision can be reached. There may be a number of reasons for this, including:

  • You have a criminal conviction
  • You are required to attend an interview
  • Your supporting documents need to be verified

Although awaiting a decision over your visa can be stressful, delays are not uncommon so try not to worry too much if things are taking longer than you anticipated. Although it’s not possible to track the progress of your own individual application, you can check for general information and updates on the Home Office’s website.

Is your visa application delayed? Here’s what you can do

Following Brexit and the delays to services caused by COVID-19, there’s currently a logjam of applications meaning many visa applications may take longer than expected. Bear this in mind if you’re currently awaiting a decision or you’re about to commence an application.

If, however, you have been waiting for much longer than the Home Office’s predicted timeframe, there are steps you can take to try to speed things up or check there are no issues with your application. These include the following:

  1. Call or write to the Home Office – You can write or phone the Home Office to find out why your application is delayed. When you make contact, explain that your application should have been dealt with by now and describe the impact the delay is having on you. The more details you include the better.
  2. Make a formal complaint – If speaking to the Home Office still doesn’t resolve the issue and accelerate the decision, you might choose to make a formal complaint. The Home Office is known to take a laboured approach to applicants’ first follow-up, so this may be a necessary step to take if you’d prefer not to wait.
  3. Write to your MP – This is another option available to you, and it’s guaranteed to get the attention of the Home Office if you ask your local MP to step in. MPs have the right to make enquiries to the Home Office on behalf of their constituents, and if the case goes unresolved they can raise a complaint with the Parliamentary and Health Service Ombudsman which will make a final decision on your case.

How can your Manchester immigration lawyers help me?

If you’re making a visa application, as mentioned previously you can avoid additional waiting time by making sure your application is filled out and submitted without any errors. Our team of highly-trained immigration lawyers will guide you through the application process every step of the way, ensuring your application form is completed to the highest possible standard and all the relevant documentation is submitted.

Your designated caseworker will also keep you updated on the status of your application and liaise with the Home Office throughout the process, helping to maximise your chances of receiving the decision you want in the shortest amount of time possible.

For more information on how we can assist with any visa application or immigration-related topic, get in touch with our Manchester immigration lawyers by calling 0161 532 7993. Our lawyers are ready to assist and can advise you on the best course of action.